UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 “When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 “In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 “They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.

 

UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 “When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 “In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 “They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.

 

UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 

The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 

Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 

“When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 

According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 

Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 

Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 

One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 

“In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 

Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 

“They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 

When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.


Tool 1-5_Skinner091113

1. Tool #3: activate your verbs.

Column published in Red and Black where I addressed those that pass out in public on campus.

http://www.redandblack.com/opinion/sleep-on-slc-patrons-sleep-on/article_dc5c2102-2563-11e2-9e47-0019bb30f31a.html

2. Tool #5: Watch those adverbs

(sorry no link, my editor for the Oconee Leader doesn’t update the website too often) This is an article I wrote for the Oconee Leader about a local farmer and entrepreneur.

Here, I use strong, active verbs to create an image of a farmer and his beloved crops. When I looked back on this work I noticed the adverb “softly” could have been deleted in the phrase, “the sun shone softly on the un-ripe strawberries, and Washington kept his eyes lowered to the plants.”

On a Saturday morning, John Washington, a family man and farmer, walked the rows of his 17 year old strawberry farm. The sun shone softly on the un-ripe strawberries, and Washington kept his eyes lowered to the plants. He paused, bent over, and swiped the morning dew off of a pale green strawberry. He plucked the strawberry of its stem, and examined it closely.
“This spot looks like frost damage,” Washington said to himself as he gently handled the pre-mature strawberry. “I might send this to my pathologist.” He pocketed the strawberry and kept walking.
For nearly two decades, Washington Farms has provided locally grown, vine ripe, produce to Oconee County.
“I pamper my strawberries,” Washington said, and, in a ripple effect, he has pampered the community as well.
On Saturday April 30, the much-anticipated strawberry season will debut with Washington Farms’ first-ever Strawberry Festival. The festival will last from 9 am to 6 pm, and admission will be $8.

Traditionally, the entertainment at Washington Farms is picking the strawberries. For most people, strawberries come in a perforated plastic box, but at Washington Farms families come to hand-pick strawberries straight from the earth. The red-all-the-way-through strawberries are not the only reason why families pick strawberries for a whole afternoon.
“Here, there is no TV, no Xbox, and no radio. Here, families have the chance to actually talk to each other,” Washington said.
At the upcoming festival, strawberry picking will be available along with a slew of other festivities. Kids can bounce on the jumping pillow, be creative with arts and crafts, ride the cow train, pet furry animals, and much more. Others can enjoy the live bands that will perform throughout the day, and people with a sweet-tooth can enjoy homemade strawberry shortcake, and homemade strawberry and peach ice-cream.
“And when I say homemade, I mean homemade,” Washington reassured.

Washington Farms is sprawling with new ideas and projects. Blackberry and blueberry farms are budding, a new stage and selling booth are being built, and carts are being painted strawberry-red.
Yet 17 years ago, Washington Farms was nothing except for a nostalgic desire.
“I wanted to play in the dirt again,” Washington said.
He had no experience, no land, and no equipment.
“I made a lot of dumb mistakes,” Washington admitted.
Yet weather is beyond any rookie or veteran farmer’s control. In Washington Farms third year a late freeze destroyed over 60% of the strawberry crop.
“My family had the choice to go hungry or diversify,” Washington said.
That same year Washington rented land and began growing pumpkins. Ever since, Washington Farms has grown to a year-round farm for families to have fun and to provide locally-grown produce.
“Now I have the chance to help others,” Washington said.
Other local farmers seek John Washington’s advice, his five children have learned the value of real work, and Washington gives the community a chance to experience the farm-life.
“When I grew up, everyone had a garden,” Washington reminisced. “But these days no one has a garden.”
Thankfully, Washington’s garden has grown large eno#ugh to feed a community for many years to come.
As the sun rose higher and the morning dew dried on the strawberry plants, John Washington looked over his farm and couldn’t help thinking of the families he has met.
“Over the years I have watched kids grow up, and now those kids are bringing their children to pick strawberries.”

3. Tool #1: Begin sentences with subjects and verbs

Column by Nicholas Kristof, op-ed writer of the NY TImes http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/25/opinion/kristof-a-policy-of-rape-continues.html?_r=0

Nearly any of Kristof’s powerful columns on female oppression world wide is a great example of this tool. Kristof pull the reader in by beginning the two lead paragraphs with “Kaltouma Ahmed cried softly” and “As the men raped her”.

4. Tool #2: Order words for emphasis

NY Times article on released Syria video of rebels killing 7 military men. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/world/middleeast/brutality-of-syrian-rebels-pose-dilemma-in-west.html?pagewanted=all

This piece utilizes tool #2 throughout the entire piece because so many significant elements are revealed in the video. Rebels are using militarisitc-style of execution, they recite a religious fueled poem of revenge before the execution, and the unedited images of seven men losing their lives is chilling. Chivers successfully packs force (and chills) with every sentence by ordering his words for emphasis.

 


Closeted Gays and Public Office

It would follow logic that if one is gay that person would promote gay rights and health in the gay community, that is, unless the person is in the closet and in public office. Ed Koch was the seated mayor of New York City when the first lethal wave of the AIDs epidemic hit the gay community. It was not until after Koch’s death that the public voiced their anguish over Koch’s absent public policy on addressing the AIDs epidemic and most attribute Koch’s stance as that of a closeted gay man trying to “eliminate any whiff of homosexuality from his profile.”

Although Koch never publicly came out as a gay man, his sexual orientation remained suspected his whole life. Since 1977, Koch put energies towards squashing any rumors on his sexuality and reporters and activists in the gay community withheld publicly outing Koch because one’s sexual orientation is his or her’s privacy. Koch garnered near equal attention for his failure in taking public action on the AIDs epidemic. The gay community had no outlet for risk reduction or health education, let alone fair access to hospitals and treatment. Koch’s New York City spent $24,500 on AIDs compared to San Francisco’s 4.3 million.

The Society of Professional Journalists states that journalists should be accountable to the public but still minimize the harm of their subjects. The question, only debated in public after Koch’s death, was whether his suspected hidden sexual orientation affected his public policy towards the gay community. As a journalist, would you have published opinion on Koch’s sexual orientation in order to address an epidemic ravaging a community with no public voice? Or, is one’s sexual orientation private and therefore should never be published on?


The Poor Know Poverty Best

Politicians debate how to solve poverty with minimum wage laws, welfare, and job creation. Reporters dispense statistics on foreclosed houses, rates of unemployment, and debt levels. The media and government provide a wealth of information on poverty in America, however the life of the poor remains distant and misunderstood by middle and upper-class Americans.

That is why Jina Moore, a freelance correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, took to homeless shelters and secondhand stores to find the face of poverty. There she found Linda Creswell, a woman living under the poverty line who “watches grain prices to see if she can afford to buy meat.” Along with other subjects, Moore used the face of poverty to write a compelling, comprehensive, and fresh look on poverty today.

Her piece, “Below the line: Poverty in America” not only garnered critical praise with a November Sidney Award but it also gave new light to statistics made stale by a repetitive media. Moore’s piece raised the level of reporting on poverty by combining personal stories and data to create a dynamic argument that America’s formula for poverty does not work.

What other popular topics in media deserve a ‘human face’ of the problem? Do you think including personal stories propels greater change or do you think it only adds desired sentimentality?


Reddit: Popular, Profitable and Breaking the law?

For internet junkies, looking to be entertained by a constant stream of hilarious photos, interesting facts, and anything odd under the sun, Reddit is the site. The site not only caters to the desire of learning trivial knowledge but it allows its readers to vote and comment on the content. The site, launched in 2005 by two fresh college graduates, immediately garnered mass appeal by the cyber community and now reaches near three billion page views a month. In 2006 the company was bought by Advance Publications and, as of 2011, operates as an independent subsidiary. This trade would resemble how most successful web companies are bought and sold, however, when a publisher such as Advance Publications (also publisher of travel magazine Conde Nast) absorbs a user-generated site like Reddit implications such as copyright and internet regulation arise.

The significance of Reddit in culture and politics is undeniable when Barack Obama becomes a subscriber. In the latest presidential election, Obama used Reddit as a platform to create a dialogue between young internet users and the Obama administration. Of course Obama’s presence on Reddit was only an innovative campaigning strategy, but a government leader using a site like Reddit is a telling sign of a future where governance and internet publication go hand-in-hand, whether amicably or the opposite.

Currently publishers, such as Advanced Publications, scoop up popular websites to gain a foothold on internet popularity and eventually profit from it. However, Reddit users, under the cloak of anonymity, have free reign to use the full spectrum of free speech, from useful commenting and democratic discourse to hate speech, violation of copyright, and invasion of privacy.

Should publishers of internet websites that invite user submissions be wary of laws made to prohibit speech and limit  information? Or, should these publications follow in the vein of internet culture, where content is an anarchic free-for-all and anything can be published? Should the government allow some leeway for internet publishing, or does that diminish the ethics of journalism?