Andy Rooney leaving “60 Minutes”

Journalist and commentator Andy Rooney will be delivering his last segment on “60 Minutes” Sunday.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Rooney, 92, was in charge of the show’s final segment,“A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” for 33 years.

Rooney has a background in public affairs reporting writing for “CBS News public-affairs broadcasts such as ‘The Twentieth Century,’ ‘News of America,’ ‘Adventure,’ ‘Calendar’ and ‘The Morning Show with Will Rogers, Jr,’” according to CBS News.

Rooney initially started his reporting while in the U.S. Army, reporting for the armed forces newspaper, “Stars and Stripes.

Rooney’s most recent book, “’Andy Rooney: 60 Years of Wisdom and Wit,’ was published by PublicAffairs in 2009,” according to CBS News.

Though Rooney will be best known for his “60 Minutes” material, his background in public affairs will forever keep him known in this field.

What sort of role did Rooney play in the history of television journalism? What does his departure mean for today’s journalism? Will we see someone fill the shoes of the notoriously funny commentator now that he has left? For someone with a history of public affairs reporting, how does Rooney stand amongst reporters today?

Happy trails, Mr. Rooney.

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One Comment on “Andy Rooney leaving “60 Minutes””

  1. I am not familiar with Mr. Rooney’s career, but from the post, I can tell you this – public affairs reporting has always been needed and will always be needed. To those saying the newspaper industry is dying, I would have to disagree. We are merely changing. The technology advanced faster than we did, and because of that, we struggled. However, people will always have a need for someone to tell them how government works and explain why things happen. There will always be an audience wanting the answers, and public affairs reporting will always be there to ask the questions. I think Mr. Rooney is a perfect example of this. Yes, he had other aspects to his career, but public affairs was the core.


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