UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 “When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 “In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 “They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.

 

UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 “When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 “In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 “They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.

 

UGA Senior Administration Receives No Human Resources Oversight

The Senior Administration at the University of Georgia is exempt from the Human Resources salary guidelines, according to Dan Helmick, a classification and compensation analyst for UGA’s Human Resources.

 

The Senior Administration includes the president, vice presidents, associate provosts, and deans. A few members of the Senior Administration, such as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten, are classified under faculty.

 

Human Resources administers a minimum and maximum pay range for all administrative positions, and follows limited guidelines for administrative pay raises. The Senior Administration does not adhere to these procedures.

 

“When you get to those upper level positions, you can’t really box them in with minimums and maximums,” said Helmick.

 

According to UGA’s Comprehensive Pay Plan, the maximum pay range caps out at $207,000 for a senior licensing manager.

 

Members of the Senior Administration, on average, receive larger salaries than even the highest paid administration positions. Michael F. Adams, the former UGA president, collected a $660,000 salary in 2012. When Adams left the presidential office in 2013, he received a one-time payment of $600,000 and will enjoy his presidential salary for another two years.  Beginning in 2015, Adams will receive a presidential base-pay of $258,000 for another three years. By 2018, Adams’ payout will total $2.7 million.

 

Vice presidents of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries ranging from $200,000 to $500,000 salaries, and associate provosts of the Presidential Cabinet receive salaries in the upper range of $100,000, according to Georgia State open records.

 

One of Dan Helmlick’s responsibilities in the Human Resources department is to classify administrative job descriptions.

 

“In 2008, Georgia State Legislature dictated that we could no longer give merit-based promotions until further notice. Therefore, the only way to receive a pay raise is if someone can demonstrate they are working beyond their job description or if they have received a promotion,” said Helmick.

 

Human Resources provides open records of all administrative job descriptions, with their minimum and maximum pay ranges, however, the job descriptions and pay ranges for the Senior Administration are not included.

 

“They are not included because they have such a unique title,” said Helmick.

 

When Human Resources can administer a pay range, they are limited to pay raises of 10% or providing a position’s maximum pay range.

In 2011, Michael F. Adams received a $50,000 pay raise as a lease agreement between the University System Board of Regents and the UGA Athletic Association. Since the raise was paid for by the UGA Athletic Association, Human Resources had no input on the pay raise, according to Helmick.


Final Video Package

JOUR 5300 Video Package (Bonus Included)


Tool 1-5_Skinner091113

1. Tool #3: activate your verbs.

Column published in Red and Black where I addressed those that pass out in public on campus.

http://www.redandblack.com/opinion/sleep-on-slc-patrons-sleep-on/article_dc5c2102-2563-11e2-9e47-0019bb30f31a.html

2. Tool #5: Watch those adverbs

(sorry no link, my editor for the Oconee Leader doesn’t update the website too often) This is an article I wrote for the Oconee Leader about a local farmer and entrepreneur.

Here, I use strong, active verbs to create an image of a farmer and his beloved crops. When I looked back on this work I noticed the adverb “softly” could have been deleted in the phrase, “the sun shone softly on the un-ripe strawberries, and Washington kept his eyes lowered to the plants.”

On a Saturday morning, John Washington, a family man and farmer, walked the rows of his 17 year old strawberry farm. The sun shone softly on the un-ripe strawberries, and Washington kept his eyes lowered to the plants. He paused, bent over, and swiped the morning dew off of a pale green strawberry. He plucked the strawberry of its stem, and examined it closely.
“This spot looks like frost damage,” Washington said to himself as he gently handled the pre-mature strawberry. “I might send this to my pathologist.” He pocketed the strawberry and kept walking.
For nearly two decades, Washington Farms has provided locally grown, vine ripe, produce to Oconee County.
“I pamper my strawberries,” Washington said, and, in a ripple effect, he has pampered the community as well.
On Saturday April 30, the much-anticipated strawberry season will debut with Washington Farms’ first-ever Strawberry Festival. The festival will last from 9 am to 6 pm, and admission will be $8.

Traditionally, the entertainment at Washington Farms is picking the strawberries. For most people, strawberries come in a perforated plastic box, but at Washington Farms families come to hand-pick strawberries straight from the earth. The red-all-the-way-through strawberries are not the only reason why families pick strawberries for a whole afternoon.
“Here, there is no TV, no Xbox, and no radio. Here, families have the chance to actually talk to each other,” Washington said.
At the upcoming festival, strawberry picking will be available along with a slew of other festivities. Kids can bounce on the jumping pillow, be creative with arts and crafts, ride the cow train, pet furry animals, and much more. Others can enjoy the live bands that will perform throughout the day, and people with a sweet-tooth can enjoy homemade strawberry shortcake, and homemade strawberry and peach ice-cream.
“And when I say homemade, I mean homemade,” Washington reassured.

Washington Farms is sprawling with new ideas and projects. Blackberry and blueberry farms are budding, a new stage and selling booth are being built, and carts are being painted strawberry-red.
Yet 17 years ago, Washington Farms was nothing except for a nostalgic desire.
“I wanted to play in the dirt again,” Washington said.
He had no experience, no land, and no equipment.
“I made a lot of dumb mistakes,” Washington admitted.
Yet weather is beyond any rookie or veteran farmer’s control. In Washington Farms third year a late freeze destroyed over 60% of the strawberry crop.
“My family had the choice to go hungry or diversify,” Washington said.
That same year Washington rented land and began growing pumpkins. Ever since, Washington Farms has grown to a year-round farm for families to have fun and to provide locally-grown produce.
“Now I have the chance to help others,” Washington said.
Other local farmers seek John Washington’s advice, his five children have learned the value of real work, and Washington gives the community a chance to experience the farm-life.
“When I grew up, everyone had a garden,” Washington reminisced. “But these days no one has a garden.”
Thankfully, Washington’s garden has grown large eno#ugh to feed a community for many years to come.
As the sun rose higher and the morning dew dried on the strawberry plants, John Washington looked over his farm and couldn’t help thinking of the families he has met.
“Over the years I have watched kids grow up, and now those kids are bringing their children to pick strawberries.”

3. Tool #1: Begin sentences with subjects and verbs

Column by Nicholas Kristof, op-ed writer of the NY TImes http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/25/opinion/kristof-a-policy-of-rape-continues.html?_r=0

Nearly any of Kristof’s powerful columns on female oppression world wide is a great example of this tool. Kristof pull the reader in by beginning the two lead paragraphs with “Kaltouma Ahmed cried softly” and “As the men raped her”.

4. Tool #2: Order words for emphasis

NY Times article on released Syria video of rebels killing 7 military men. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/world/middleeast/brutality-of-syrian-rebels-pose-dilemma-in-west.html?pagewanted=all

This piece utilizes tool #2 throughout the entire piece because so many significant elements are revealed in the video. Rebels are using militarisitc-style of execution, they recite a religious fueled poem of revenge before the execution, and the unedited images of seven men losing their lives is chilling. Chivers successfully packs force (and chills) with every sentence by ordering his words for emphasis.

 


Athens sees red

David Iduate

Diduate6@uga.edu

Story: crime statistics report

Headline: Athens sees red

ATHENS –- A 40% increase of murder since last year leaves an alarming number of citizens with grief of losing their loved ones.

Only time will tell if the people of Athens are willing to improve their ethics. According to the Bureau of Investigation, someone commits assault every 41 minutes, and homicide occurs about every 63 hours.

“The increase in violent crime reflects a greater social problem that can’t be solved by police alone.” states Mike Stiers, division chief of the Investigation bureau.

Only so much law enforcement can protect us before our freedom as citizens also becomes jeopardized. Fellow Athenians must find, as in all things, a better relationship within their community,

“People need to realize this.  They need to demand of their legislators, both state and municipal, that they don’t want to live like this.” Stiers states, in an attempt to encourage locals to strive for betterness in the years to come.


Integrating the Web in Journalism Schools

With the digital age underway and the growing use of the internet, journalism schools across the country are switching up and making their education more “digitally based”. In an effort to help foster this growth, the Knight Foundation was established to help support and fund social media and internet advancement in the field of journalism.

While several journalism schools are embracing these changes, many other schools are struggling to master the internet and the media. According to the Knight Foundation, most journalism schools continue to “keep their print and broadcast tracks separate” and do not emphasize the importance of social media.

As a result, foundations such as the Knight Foundation as well as the McCormick Foundation are pressuring journalism schools “to change the way journalism is taught” by “supporting the reform of journalism and mass communication education”. And if the schools were not to do so, they could potentially lose funding. While some journalism schools agree with this notion and praise these foundations for forcing change, other schools are skeptical and argue that this added pressure would conflict with accreditation requirements.

Is the mastery of the internet and social media now a necessity in the journalism field? Should journalism schools be forced to change up their education to incorporate the growing prevalence of the media? Are these foundations (such as the Knight Foundation) stepping over their boundaries by threatening to cut off funding for journalism schools who fail to comply?


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.